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3 Requirements of a Tort

If you or someone you know has suffered an injury because of someone else’s negligent actions, you may be facing a series of consequences including physical injuries and even financial strain from paying medical bills. Injuries caused by someone else’s negligence can cause long term damage including serious injuries and lost wages from missing work. In tort law, a plaintiff that has suffered an injury because of someone else’s actions can file a lawsuit against the individual (defendant) to pursue financial compensation.

If you have been harmed due to the negligent actions of another party, you need a qualified legal professional on your side to help you to protect your legal rights and interests. Contact the Cedar Rapids personal injury lawyers of Leehey Olson Law, P.C., at (319) 294-4424 to schedule a free consultation to discuss your legal options.

Elements of a Tort

Torts, or personal injury cases, are almost always handled outside the court of law between the two individuals and his or her respective attorney. In order to have a case, the plaintiff must prove the defendant acted negligently. For this to happen, the following three requirements of a tort must be present:

  • The defendant owed the plaintiff a certain duty of care
  • The defendant breached the duty through negligent or reckless action or inaction
  • The plaintiff suffered an injury that can be measured

Contact Us

For more information about your legal rights and options if you have been the victim of another party’s negligence, contact the Cedar Rapids personal injury lawyers of Leehey Olson Law, P.C., by calling (319) 294-4424 today.

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